Monday, March 30, 2020

God - A Review



What is god? How did such an idea become part of human life? What does it actually do? What is its future?
https://hubpages.com/politics/God-A-Review

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Should there be Worry?



Should there be Worry?
There exists scope, for re-examining all that is associated, primarily, only with human life. For the reason that the origins of many of those are shrouded in obscure beliefs. Those beliefs that are unable to withstand the forces of time and tide, do get reviewed sometimes. The collection of all such reviews, where each one has the potential to spark many new reviews, is what we acknowledge as knowledge, say as science, humanities, etc., depending on repeat-ability of the findings of the review. But the other beliefs, a brute majority, continue to play havoc, since we all turn a blind eye to it.
My blog entry ‘Is human a complex life?’, explores this, and finds that, we humans, rather than looking for an answer to this, close their eyes to this brute majority, and are merrily relaxing. As they are also taking efforts to make themselves more and more comfortable in the existing circumstances, they continue to remain blind to this issue. On top of it, saying, life is beyond comprehension, they happily ignore warning signs or other inputs, unless there is reason not to do so. To counter this, human race needs to go back to the plotting table, and come up with fresh ideas about how to live, and originate a new set of priorities that form human nature. https://hubpages.com/education/Origin-of-Human-Nature
Let me start the ball rolling, by having a close look at one significant element of human nature, worry, something widely accepted as universal.
Is it Needed?
The prevailing response seems to be a firm ‘no’, whether from common people, academic luminaries or from professional psychologists. But I feel otherwise. If something is associated with a life, it should be serving a purpose clearly related to that particular life. And worry is a universal phenomenon associated with humans. Hence, it should be serving something essential for the whole race, in addition to the consequences we presently entertain, whether predictable or unpredictable, welcome or unwelcome.
Now, let us ask afresh, what exactly is worry?
To answer it, I think, we need to examine, which human want is being met by worry, or what purpose, it is meeting. What use, worry is of? A plausible reply is, I think, worry originated as a mental attempt, or a reminder to it, to confront, or avoid, a threat. Where the threat could be a real one, or one that has become one as a result of the current priorities, each society entertain. (Just as happiness would have originated as a reminder to continue with whatever affair is leading to the current instance of relaxed feeling or contentment) It is a vital part of survival, as well as that of the successful conduct of the entity, one is currently engaged in. Though presently programmed automation takes care of much of such needs, for the early humans, it surely would have been of utmost importance. For example, one worried about a danger in hiding, or of an impending storm, would have been moving around better equipped and with greater care. And if, say a wild animal appeared, since worry would have been keeping them well geared, and their reflexes sharp, quite appropriate would have been the steps that followed. (Naturally, people with such a genetic make up have a greater chance of survival. Those predisposed to excessive worry (and happiness) multiply as generations go, and, unfortunately, the population of the calm and serene lot, dwindle!) So, effectively, worry is nothing but a reminder, and of course, one of great significance.
What can it do for us?
In that case, worry, or everything unpleasant, as well as those pleasant, deserve to be seen as life saving institutions. Clearly, pleasant experiences add to our longevity, we all know. The unpleasant ones also do it, by leading us to suppress, or avoid, things that adversely affect the same. This perhaps is the original reason, both for happiness and unhappiness. Say I see someone close to me die. If am unhappy, I am likely to be looking for the reasons for that death, and take actions to counter it or stay away from the same. Just as this, when I am happy with something, I will feel encouraged to be associated more with it. Both of which, adding to my state of bliss and longevity.
But, what is the reality?
However, over time, worry would have got cemented as a part of our basic character, each generation celebrating it as a unique facet of the human. Where, rather than acting as a signal, and perhaps as a life saving measure, worry takes position as a part of the default ambience, the human race show at all times. ( As I have elaborated in my hub https://hubpages.com/politics/How-to-Make-Human-Society-Peaceful, we continue to cling on to worry, though irrelevant in the new world. Hence we always need to come up with a good reason to worry!)
Naturally, it became the prime route, we people took for ‘wasting time’, for the reasons described in my book, The Unsure Male. In fact overindulgence in whatever is one’s current interest, is a favorite activity for humans. Worry is a fit candidate here, since, one is less likely to feel fed up of it, unlike pleasurable feelings. Thus it became omnipresent, as far as human life go, and, it monopolized one’s emotional make up. And, it started to displace many helpful emotions, becoming a threat to longevity.
Is Worry a Virtue?
The original idea of worry as a subtle reminder does not accord the status of a virtue to it, since one need not engage with it for no reason. Also, no instance of such reminders shall go unattended. Consequently there may not be any ‘orphaned instances’ of worry to keep one engaged, an essential attribute of a virtue. (A virtue is one in which one can engage for no reason and feel happy)
But in reality, it isn’t so, we worry, whether a reason exists for it, or not. The abstractions associated with human life, like duty, honor, etc., are of great use here, it can produce a reason for worry, out of nothing. And it made worry the best medium for ‘wasting time’. Thus, humans succeeded in making a virtue out of necessity. Though the original reason for institution of the same would have been getting lost on the way, as generations go by, worry continues to remain an integral part of the human, thanks to the persistent nature of all things irrational. (And the fleeting nature of everything rational, where even the best of theories will sway at the weakest opposition from another one) Which is understandable, for, even in this age of language and writing, it is not very easy to get rid of a crazy or harmful idea from the past or, prevent genuine, helpful ones from fading to oblivion, that too, notwithstanding the best efforts in record-keeping.
(I think this needs an explanation. Things rational are highly volatile, while those irrational, remain for ever. This is the main observation that led me to my theory of the unsure male, in which I found that the primary motivation for dealing with things, both rational and irrational, is the urge to occupy oneself. For, further study of things rational can lead to new revelations and more things to ponder, while a deep foray into things irrational could render it useful no more, by revealing its true nature or insignificance.)
Why has it Engulfed Us?
As we continued to overcome the dangers, the earlier days posed, every success, effectively rendered ineffective, at least one avenue for worrying. However, the propensity to worry remained unabated, which had to now look for new outlets. As a result, worry has become a part of everything humans do. To ensure this, wherever there is no natural scope for worry, we are constantly instituting abstract values. Thus worry can easily fit in, in whatever we do. In fact no other form of life is affected by it. Even if we take certain peculiar expression seen among other species as those of anguish, there is no instance of such expressions causing disruption to any activity of life.
What can we do?
It is clear, humans succeeded in making a virtue out of necessity. Though the original reason for institution of the same would have been getting lost on the way, as generations go by, worry continues to remain an integral part of the human, thanks to the persistent nature of all things irrational. (And the fleeting nature of everything rational, where even the best of theories will sway at the weakest opposition from another one) Which is understandable, for, even in this age of language and writing, it is not very easy to get rid of a crazy or harmful idea from the past or, prevent genuine, helpful ones from fading to oblivion, that too, notwithstanding the best efforts in record-keeping.
(I think this needs an explanation. Things rational are highly volatile, while those irrational, remain for ever. This is the main observation that led me to my theory of the unsure male, in which I found that the primary motivation for dealing with things, both rational and irrational, is the urge to occupy oneself. For, further study of things rational can lead to new revelations and more things to ponder, while a deep foray into things irrational could render it useful no more, by revealing its true nature, or insignificance.)
We only need to keep in mind that there will be worry, as long as we take worry as something worrisome. Once we start considering as a useful input, worry will also wane like any other happy feeling or sentiment, since as time goes by, or when circumstances change, its impact or utility will diminish.


Sunday, February 9, 2020

Another Thought


In my hub ‘why is there unrest’, I said that beliefs make the human society a turbulent one. One way to confront this situation is to deem all such inputs as mental germs, accepting one, only if it is proved harmless. Another hub, ‘A-New-Approach-to-Mental-Health’, gave an account of it, and suggested a remedy. 
Still another remedy, a more permanent one, is also a fairly simple one. Be flexible, especially with the abstract tenets, every society is abundant with. https://hubpages.com/politics/Why-Should-there-be-Unrest





Saturday, January 18, 2020

What Use, the Past?

What can we do with the past. And, what are we doing with the past? When it comes to the inanimate, or it is about living beings other than humans, we are quite rational and thoughtful in learning from the past to make a better future. Whereas, when it comes to ourselves, we are not so. Isn't there room for a rethink?
https://hubpages.com/education/What-use-the-past

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Why Worry?


Should there be Worry?

There exists scope to re-examine all that is associated primarily with human life, the arguments presented in my blog entry ‘Is human a complex life?’, say. Let me have close look at worry, something widely accepted as universal, as far as the human race go.
What is worry? If something is associated with our lives, it should be serving a purpose. I therefore think, worry originated as a mental attempt, or a reminder to it, to confront, or avoid, a threat. For the early humans, it would have been a vital part of survival. For example, one worried about a danger in hiding would have been moving around better equipped and with greater care. And if, say a wild animal appeared, since the worry would have been keeping such one’s reflexes sharp, quite appropriate steps would have followed. (The people with such a genetic make up have a greater chance of survival, making worry more widespread, as generations go!)
Over time, worry would have got cemented as a part of human character, each generation celebrating it as a unique facet of the human. Though the original reason for institution of the same would have got lost on the way, as generations went by, worry continues to remain an integral part of the human, thanks to the persistent nature of things. (Which is understandable, for even in this age of language and writing, it is not very easy to get rid of crazy ideas from the past or prevent genuine ones from fading to oblivion)
Thus, as we continued to overcome the dangers, the earlier days posed, the propensity to worry kept on looking for new outlets. As a result, worry has become a part of human life, though no other form is affected by it. Even if we take certain peculiar expression seen among other species as those of anguish, there is no instance of such expressions causing disruption to any activity of life.
But my feeling is that we need not consider worry as a specific issue and prevent manifestations of its volatile nature. In which case, it will occur at diminishing intervals as the need for reflexive reactions dwindle, while human life progress towards the better.


Thursday, December 19, 2019

Democratic governance will likely fail unless a country’s citizens have already adopted values that accompany democracy..  This is ever more significant these days, when great democracies face significant threat internally.
https://www.sciencenews.org/article/installing-democracies-may-not-work-without-prior-cultural-shifts

Saturday, December 7, 2019

Book Review: The Critique of Practical Reason


Book Review: The Critique of Practical Reason - Immanuel Kant
The book begins with a brief exposition of the ‘theoretical use of reason’. How, the primary role played by reason is for understanding things well. Which leads to instances where reason crosses its limits, and could get lost in meaningless or contradictory notions, while giving no indication of anything amiss. ‘Clearly’, the author states, ‘this is different from the practical use of reason’.
The book then goes on to explain the principles of practical reason, the primary one of which is that these are subjective or objective, as the situations demand. The next principle stipulates that practical reason is always founded on empirical data, like the relevance or effectiveness of a pain being solidly linked to the current state, the subject happens to be in.
Then comes the cases where we consider pure reason and practical reason as one and the same. In fact moral law is nothing but a codified summary of all such instances, the book states. Thus, morality essentially is practical reason independent of the subjects. Not only that, the ideas we entertain in respect of god, god’s word, soul, and immortality, are also relevant only within the confines of moral law.
The book then goes on to examine the significance of reason in our day to day activities. Quite a few interesting observations are shown here. Like, it is a common sight to see people extolling actions that display a great, unselfish, and sympathetic mind. But, by giving too much attention to ‘elevating the soul’, and too little to ‘adherence to duty’, societies are missing, the good they could get, and the message, that could deliver to all.
The book concludes with a description of the pitfalls, practical reason always face. ‘Admiration and respect’, something a very welcome from anyone, ‘instead of exciting one to inquiry, is effectively stopping one’s growth by supplying the want of it’. Just as the study into ‘the fall of a stone’, or ‘the motion of a sling’ helped us in resolving many difficult questions of the study of forces of nature, an inquiry into the areas of moral judgement and reason can prevent us from going astray.
Excellent thoughts. Firstly it makes clear, how the nonstop articulation and deduction, many a time, contradictory, shown by quite a few among us could be simply ignored as ‘reason crossing its limits’. What is now becoming popular, I think thanks to the success of object oriented computer programming, is to have an object oriented view on all aspects of life. Which incidentally is what this book advocated, years back.


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